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Emergency Preparedness & Life Safety

HealthCap’s® Free Active Shooter Preparedness Webinar

HealthCap® offers a free webinar titled Active Shooter Preparedness. This July 2022 program focuses on key aspects of active shooter events and what to do if your long term care community experiences a threat or real-life active shooter.  The training helps answer these questions: 

  • Who will you call?
  • Who will you notify?
  • How will you deploy your staff and use additional resources?
  • What are the keys to protecting your residents and staff?
  • How to work, in advance, with local law enforcement?

Registration for all participants is free. Individuals will need to create a login if they don’t already have a HealthCap login. The webinar is approved for 1.0 ANCC contact hours and 1.25 NAB CEs upon completion.

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Additional Resources

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Completion of this training is intended to prepare you to develop, manage and maintain a surge plan.

    This course is free and was designed to meet the critical staff shortages occurring as a result of COVID-19. You will need to register and create an account using your name and e-mail. Once you have created your account, you may complete the course on your own time, stopping as needed, and then rejoining the class wherever you left off. 

    Completion of this training is intended to prepare you to develop, manage and maintain a surge plan. 

    Key Takeaways 

    • Types of Surge (Begins at 9-minute mark) 
    • Components of a Surge Plan (Begins at ~10:48 minute mark) 
      • Space – Structure  
      • Staff – Identifying staff requirements 
      • Stuff – Equipment and Supplies Needed 
      • Systems – Policies and Procedures to keep residents and staff safe 
      • Safety – Providing a safe environment for residents, staff and visitors 
    • How to Develop your Surge Plan (Begins at ~16:55 minute mark)  
      • Understand the lifecycle of a surge event 
      • Include Infectious Disease Expert when developing plans, team effort to develop 

    Presented by RPA, a Jensen Hughes Company

    Main Office, 500 CrossKeys Office Park

    Fairport, NY 14450


    © 2022 American Health Care Association. All rights reserved. 

    All How to Prepare your Facility for Surge materials subject to this copyright may be photocopied or distributed for the purpose of nonprofit or educational advancement. The use, photocopying, and distribution for commercial purposes of any of these materials is expressly prohibited without the prior written permission of American Health Care Association.

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    The tips are for individual deficiencies which have been frequently cited across the U.S. The tips provided are intended for reference only. If you have further questions, refer to the applicable NFPA Code manuals and/or please contact regulatory@ahca.org.

    The Centers of Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) require participating skilled nursing facilities to comply with the requirements of the National Fire Protection Association 101-2012 Edition, commonly referred to as the Life Safety Code (LSC) as well as the NFPA 99 – 2012 edition known as the Health Care Facilities Code.  These codes are a comprehensive set of requirements, which provide nursing home residents a high level of safety and security due to the nature of illness, impairment and the inability to self-evacuate in an emergency.

    There are specific occupancy chapters of the LSC which apply to your center.  Facilities certified originally before July 5, 2016 are considered existing and Chapter 19 applies.  Facilities that have been certified after July 5, 2016 are addressed as new facilities and then Chapter 18 applies.  The Life Safety and Health Care Facilities Codes themselves are not all inclusive and often reference other editions of NFPA codes.

    A number of issues have arisen based on the requirements of the NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code.  NFPA 99 establishes criteria for systems in nursing facilities such as gas and vacuum, electrical, etc. The requirements, however, generally are applied only to new construction and new equipment. Several chapters begin with specifying which criteria are applicable to existing facilities. Generally, existing facility systems are permitted to remain, even if they are not in strict compliance with the code, unless the authority having jurisdiction determines that their continued use constitutes a distinct hazard to life. If facilities are consider altering, modernizing or replacing equipment, the ‘new’ system or individual component are required to meet the installation and equipment requirements stated in NFPA 99.

    The tips are for individual deficiencies which have been frequently cited across the U.S.  The tips provided are intended for reference only. If you have further questions, refer to the applicable NFPA Code manuals and/or please contact regulatory@ahca.org. 


    © 2022 American Health Care Association. All rights reserved. 

    All Life Safety Tips materials subject to this copyright may be photocopied or distributed for the purpose of nonprofit or educational advancement. The use, photocopying, and distribution for commercial purposes of any of these materials is expressly prohibited without the prior written permission of American Health Care Association.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    This Power Point presentation will provide the necessary information to inspect doors for safety.

    This PowerPoint presentation will provide the necessary information to inspect doors for safety. Take the quiz to demonstrate competency in this area.


    These materials have been updated as of 5/25/18

    Email educate@ahca.org if you need assistance.


    © 2022 American Health Care Association. All rights reserved. 

    All Life Safety: Fire and Smoke Door Inspection Training materials subject to this copyright may be photocopied or distributed for the purpose of nonprofit or educational advancement. The use, photocopying, and distribution for commercial purposes of any of these materials is expressly prohibited without the prior written permission of American Health Care Association.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Life Safety Code section 7.2.1.15.2 requires all fire and smoke doors to be inspected and tested annually. This helpful checklist serves as a vital tool to perform a annual inspection.

    Life Safety Code section 7.2.1.15.2 requires all fire and smoke doors to be inspected and tested annually. This helpful checklist serves as a vital tool to perform a annual inspection.


    © 2022 American Health Care Association. All rights reserved. 

    All Life Safety:Fire Smoke Door Inspection Form materials subject to this copyright may be photocopied or distributed for the purpose of nonprofit or educational advancement. The use, photocopying, and distribution for commercial purposes of any of these materials is expressly prohibited without the prior written permission of American Health Care Association.

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